Reporter Asks Why Trump Hasn’t ‘Written Any Legislation.’ Sanders’s Response Is Constitution 101

The Trump administration has made waves in their announcement that they will be ending Obama era protections for young, undocumented immigrants, known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA. According to a press release from the White House today, the Justice Department found that the Obama actions were unconstitutional:

The legislative branch, not the executive branch, writes these laws – this is the bedrock of our Constitutional system, which I took a solemn oath to preserve, protect, and defend.

In June of 2012, President Obama bypassed Congress to give work permits, social security numbers, and federal benefits to approximately 800,000 illegal immigrants currently between the ages of 15 and 36. The typical recipients of this executive amnesty, known as DACA, are in their twenties. Legislation offering these same benefits had been introduced in Congress on numerous occasions and rejected each time.

In referencing the idea of creating new immigration rules unilaterally, President Obama admitted that “I can’t just do these things by myself” – and yet that is exactly what he did, making an end-run around Congress and violating the core tenets that sustain our Republic.

At today’s White House briefing, Sarah Sanders received dozens of questions over the administration’s decision to end DACA. One question, in particular, asked why Trump has not written any legislation himself pertaining to immigration policy.

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Reporter:

“The president basically told Congress to do this but he hasn’t written any legislation similar to how he approached…”

Sanders cut off the reporter’s question immediately, stating:

“I didn’t know it was the president’s job to write out specific details of legislation.”

The reporter rephrased the question asking whether Trump was going to reach out to allies in Congress to introduce the legislation and work closely with Congress to determine how to go about the issue.

The point was made though. According to the U.S. Constitution, the president does not write legislation, Congress does. Not understanding that principle seems to be the problem here.

Watch the full event below:

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